Golden Labrador is ‘left locked inside a campervan with windows closed for three days’ before police smashed their way in to rescue the dog


Golden Labrador is ‘left locked inside a campervan with windows closed for three days’ before police smashed their way in to rescue the dog

  • Police attended a call after concerns were raised for the welfare of the dog
  • Reports suggested no windows were open on the vehicle after it was parked up
  • DO YOU KNOW THE DOG’S OWNERS? Email dan.woodland@mailonline.co.uk 

A Golden Labrador was reportedly left locked inside a campervan for three days before police smashed open a window to rescue it. 

Officers from Greater Manchester Police attended a call at around 1.15pm on Sunday afternoon after concerns were raised for the welfare of the dog trapped inside the vehicle.

Reports suggested there were no windows open and that no people had been seen in or around the van since it had been abandoned. 

Temperatures reached up to 23C in parts of Manchester on Sunday, according to the Met Office.

Officers at the scene broke the window to the campervan to rescue the dog, who is now being cared for in a rescue centre whilst attempts are being made to trace the owners.

DO YOU KNOW THE DOG’S OWNERS? Email dan.woodland@mailonline.co.uk 

A Golden Labrador was reportedly left locked inside a campervan for three days before police smashed open a window to rescue it

Police attended a call at around 1.15pm on Sunday afternoon after concerns were raised for the welfare of a dog in a vehicle which had reportedly been parked up for three days

Police attended a call at around 1.15pm on Sunday afternoon after concerns were raised for the welfare of a dog in a vehicle which had reportedly been parked up for three days

Reports suggested there were no windows open and that no people had been seen in or around the van since it had been abandoned

Reports suggested there were no windows open and that no people had been seen in or around the van since it had been abandoned

Chief Inspector of Neighbourhoods in CoM Central Chris Boyd, said: ‘It is just not acceptable to allow a dog to be in a vehicle on their own for even a couple of hours, let alone three days.

What to do if you see a dog in a car on a warn day 

First, assess the dog’s condition. If they’re showing any signs of heatstroke dial 999 at once.

If the dog’s condition is critical, and the police haven’t arrived yet, your instinct will be to break into the car to free them. But please be aware that this could be classed as criminal damage. You may need to defend your actions in court, so please be sure you’re doing the right thing. Legally, you can commit damage if you believe the car owner would consent to it if they knew the dog was in danger.

If you’re sure you need to free the dog, tell the police what you intend to do and why. Take photos or videos of the dog. Are there any other witnesses? Take their names and telephone numbers.

Don’t be afraid to dial 999. If it’s an emergency, we may not be able to get to you – and the dog – quickly enough. And as we have no powers of entry, we’d need to ask the police to help us rescue the dog. Don’t worry – the police will soon let us know if the dog needs our help.

 What to do once the dog is free

Check if the dog is showing signs of heatstroke or is in distress. If they are, immediately follow our emergency first aid advice. This could mean the difference between life and death for the dog.

Source: rspca.org.uk 

‘When we found him, there were no open windows and, with it being quite warm today, this could have ended up a disaster. 

‘Dogs don’t respond to the heat like humans do and as such, this lovely dog could have overheated.

‘Even leaving a window open or a bowl of water is not good enough. Just don’t leave your dog on it’s own in a vehicle. 

‘If you are planning on being away from your vehicle, then don’t take the risk and leave your dog at home.’

Scientists have previously warned that leaving dogs in parked cars can be dangerous all year round, even in the winter when outside temperatures are relatively low. 

Dog welfare experts at Nottingham Trent University monitored internal temperatures of cars in the UK, without dogs inside them, every day for two years, reports from 2020 reveal. 

They found temperatures exceeded 77°F (25°C) in every month of the year – high enough to cause overheating in breeds with flat faces, such as bulldogs and pugs.  

Annual campaigns highlighting the risk of dogs dying in hot cars typically begin in May but need to start earlier in the year, they said. 

Between 2010 and 2019 the RSPCA received almost 70,000 calls about animals and heat exposure, most of which related to dogs in hot cars. 

Just 20 minutes in a car that is too hot can cause heat stroke, which kills one in seven dogs diagnosed with the condition. 

Most dogs are comfortable at temperatures between 59°F and 77°F, but this is dependent on breed, coat length, fitness and other factors, the researchers said. 

Dogs should never be left alone in cars, as even just a few minutes trapped in the stifling heat can be fatal. 



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